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COMMERCIAL GLASS PULVERIZERS

Our Glass Pulverizer models are geared towards glass bottle recycling centers, municipalities and bottlers that process up to 1000 -1500 lbs per hour.

GLASS PULVERIZER – MODEL GP 1000

“Pulverizes Glass into Sand and Gravel – Recycling Centers, Municipalities and Bottlers”

The GP-1000 Glass Pulverizer was developed as an economical solution for low to medium volume glass bottle recyclers. Internal trommel screen separates glass into two usable sizes: -1/8″ and -3/8″ pulverized glass. This glass pulverizer is ideal for recycling centers, municipalities, bottlers or any other user requiring -1/8″ pulverized glass and -3/8″ pulverized glass. Processes up to 1000 lbs per hour.

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GLASS PULVERIZER – MODEL GP 1500C

“The Conveyor Fed Version of the GP-1000 with a Higher Throughput that Pulverizes Glass into Sand and Gravel – Recycling Centers, Municipalities and Bottlers”

The GP-1500C Glass Pulverizer uses the same proprietary crushing mechanism as the GP-1000 but incorporates a 10″ wide feed conveyor and hopper to increase the throughput. The GP-1500C is an economical solution for low to medium volume glass bottle recyclers. Internal trommel screen separates glass into two usable sizes: -1/8″ and -3/8″ pulverized glass. This glass pulverizer is ideal for recycling centers, municipalities, bottlers or any other user requiring -1/8″ pulverized glass and -3/8″ pulverized glass. Processes up to 1500 lbs per hour.

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LEARN HOW MUNICIPALITIES ARE USING THE GLASS PULVERIZER MODELS

As recycling and landfill tipping fees increase, one Tennessee city has turned to recycling glass in-house to save money while still staying green. The cost of recycling glass via private firms and businesses has gone up, leading some cities to forgo recycling glass in favor of dumping it in landfills, which has become cheaper than recycling. Zach Wilkinson, director of public works for the city of Gallatin, said his city was one of many municipalities facing cost issues when it comes to glass recycling.

“I think a lot of communities are facing a similar issue with glass,” Wilkinson said. “The demand for it in the market has disappeared over the last several years. It costs more to send it off to be recycled than to just landfill it, which was the situation we were in. It was really obvious to me that it wasn’t cost effective to haul the glass and then pay a higher tipping fee to have it recycled.”

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